FHX2: Fire History Software

FHX2 Software

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Quick Links
What is FHX2? Graphics Example What Comes with FHX2? Statistics Menu
Downloading Information Purchasing Information Citation and References Current Users


What is FHX2?

FHX2 is software developed to analyze the fire history of forests revealed by fire scars and other fire-related injuries found in the annual growth rings of trees. FHX2 provides a means for entering, archiving, storing, editing, and manipulation of fire history information from tree rings, which in turn, provides a more efficient mechanism for data storage and exchange. FHX2 creates master fire charts displaying fire chronologies for individual trees or for individual sites. FHX2 has powerful statistical functions for analyzing the seasonality of past fires, temporal changes in fire regimes, or spatial differences in fire occurrence between sites. FHX2 also provides access to a superposed epoch analysis program for analyzing the relationship between past fire and climate.

Great Graphics!

The Graphics Module creates, displays, and prints master fire charts. Each horizontal line can represent one tree, a subsite, composite information for an entire site, or an entire region. Each small vertical bar represents a dated fire event.

What is contained in the FHX2 system:

File NameFunction
FHX2.EXEMain program that launches other modules
FHGRAPH.EXECreates screen and hardcopy graphics
FHSTATS.EXEProvides in-depth statistical functions
FHENTER.EXEAllows easy data entry
FHIMPORT.EXEImports data from the LTRR database
FHEVENT.EXEPerforms superposed epoch analysis
FHREAD.EXEFile viewer called by statistics module
FHINFO.EXEProvides hardware information
DSHELL.EXEExecutes a DOS shell
VIEW.EXEViews fire history graphics onscreen
PLOT.EXEPlots fire history graphics to hardcopy
INSTALL.EXEInstalls the graphics/printing devices
INSTALL.DLBDriver library for graphics/printing devices
PET.DATSample demonstration data file
*.SYMAll fonts used for graphing


It does Statistics!

The Main Menu of the Statistics Module. FHX2 can analyze fire seasonality, fire intervals, temporal stability, or spatial differences in past fire regimes.

Downloading information:

Download the program EXTRACT.EXE (ca 400 KB). If you have difficulty using your Web browser to download this, you might try an FTP client to our anonymous FTP site, ftp.LTRR.Arizona.EDU, remembering to set binary mode when you transfer the file (conversely if you have difficulty with FTP, try here instead). Once you have transferred the file over to the proper subdirectory, simply type extract at the prompt and the file will self-extract. Once the files are extracted, the file EXTRACT.EXE can be copied and stored for later use and deleted from the current subdirectory. Do not attempt to run the EXTRACT file until it is copied to the proper subdirectory.



Acknowledgements:

Many individuals helped significantly with the development and testing of the FHX2 software. I first must thank the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research for providing me with facilities and computers on which to develop this software. Dr. Thomas W. Swetnam is the driving force behind our fire history/ecology research, and to him I am particularly grateful. Kiyomi Morino offered numerous helpful suggestions in all stages of the development of this software, and this software benefits greatly from her comments, suggestions, and testing. Ramzi Touchan and Craig Allen also tested the software in its earliest stages, and suggested many useful ideas that improved the software. The comments and ideas of Tony Caprio, Chris Baisan, and Linda Mutch are also greatly appreciated. If any users have ideas on how they would like to see this software improved, please drop me a message at the e-mail address below.

Purchasing Information:

As much as I would like to dispense this software free to research, academic, and federal institutions, I simply can not. I arranged a license agreement with Golden Software to distribute their software and files (programs VIEW, PLOT, INSTALL, and all fonts) in return for a cash payment to be made every time a copy of this software is distributed. Unless otherwise arranged with me, by obtaining this software, you agree to purchase this software for the sum total of $129.95 made payable to me at the address given below. Feel free to contact me for further information.

Proper Citation:

NOTE: As with any software, I expect proper citation to be given to this software when used for your research, just as you would programs ARSTAN and COFECHA, for example. If you don't have my dissertation, then you can use the User's Manual as the proper citation.

Grissino-Mayer, H.D. 1995. Tree-ring reconstructions of climate and fire history at El Malpais National Monument, New Mexico. Ph.D. dissertation, The University of Arizona, Tucson. 407 pp.
or
Grissino-Mayer, Henri D. 1995. FHX2: Software for the Analysis of Fire History from Tree Rings. Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, The University of Arizona, Tucson.



For additional references, this software was extensively used in the following studies (listed chronologically):

Grissino-Mayer, H.D., Baisan, C.H., and Swetnam, T.W. 1994. Fire history and age structure analyses in the mixed-conifer and spruce-fir forests of the Pinaleno Mountains, southeastern Arizona. Final Report, Mt. Graham Red Squirrel Study Committee, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Forest Service, Phoenix, AZ. 73 pp.

Grissino-Mayer, H.D. 1995. Tree-ring reconstructions of climate and fire history at El Malpais National Monument, New Mexico. Ph.D. dissertation, The University of Arizona, Tucson. 407 pp.

Ortloff, W., Goldammer, J.G., Schweingruber, F.H., and Swetnam, T.W. 1995. Jahrringanalytische Untersuchungen zur Feuergeschichte eines Bestandes von Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. in den Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona, USA. [Dendrochronological investigations of fire history in Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. stands of the Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona, USA.] Forstarchiv 66: 206-214.

Grissino-Mayer, H.D., Baisan, C.H., and Swetnam, T.W. 1995. Fire history in the Pinaleno Mountains of southern Arizona: Effects of human- related disturbances. In Debano, L.F., Gottfried, G.J., Hamre, R.H., Edminster, C.B., Ffolliott, P.F., and Ortega-Rubio, A., eds., Biodiversity and Management of the Madrean Archipelago: The Sky Islands of Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. Ft. Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service, General Technical Report RM-GTR-264: 399-407.

Guyette, R.P., and Dey, D.C. 1995. A presettlement fire history in an oak-pine forest near Basin Lake, Algonquin Park, Ontario. Ontario Forestry Research Institute Forest Research Report 132. 7 pp.

Guyette, R.P., Dey, D.C., and McDonell, C. 1995. Determining fire history from old white pine stumps in an oak-pine forest in Bracebridge, Ontario. Ontario Forestry Research Institute Forest Research Report 133. 9 pp.

Morino, K.A. 1996. Reconstruction and interpretation of historical patterns of fire occurrence in the Organ Mountains, New Mexico. M.S. thesis, The University of Arizona, Tucson. 144 pp.

McCord, V.A.S. 1996. Flood history reconstruction in Frijoles Canyon using flood-scarred trees. In C.D. Allen, ed., Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the Second La Mesa Fire Symposium. USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM-GTR-286: 33-46.

Touchan, R., Allen, C.D., and Swetnam, T.W. 1996. Fire history and climatic patterns in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests of the Jemez Mountains, northern New Mexico. In C.D. Allen, ed., Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the Second La Mesa Fire Symposium. USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM-GTR-286: 33-46.

Swetnam, T.W., and Baisan, C.H. 1996. Historical fire regime patterns in the Southwestern United States since AD 1700. In C.D. Allen, ed., Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the Second La Mesa Fire Symposium. USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM-GTR-286: 11-32.



A List of Current Users:

Craig Allen, Jemez Mountains Field Station, National Biological Survey, Bandelier National Monument, Los Alamos, NM 87544-9701 USA

Thomas B. Bragg, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Nebraska - Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0040 USA

Peter Brown, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, 240 W. Prospect Rd., Ft. Collins, CO 80526 USA

Jack Burk, Department of Biological Sciences, California State University - Fullerton, 800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton, CA, 92634 USA

Joel Carlson, Woodland and Natural Areas Office, University of New Hampshire, 102 Pettee Hall, Durham, NH 03824 USA

Lori D. Daniels, Department of Geography, Campus Box 270, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0270 USA

Peter Z. Fule, School of Forestry, P.O. Box 15018, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA

Robert W. Gray, San Carlos Apache Tribe, Division of Forestry, San Carlos, AZ 85550 USA

Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA

Richard P. Guyette, I-30 Agriculture Building, The School of Natural Resources, The University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 USA

Emily Heyerdahl, College of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA

Bob Keeland, National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajun Dome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 USA

Karel Klinka, Forest Sciences Dept., 270-2357 Main Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CANADA V6T 1Z4

Hannu Lehtonen, Karelian Institute, Section of Ecology, P.O. Box 111, University of Joensuu, SF-80101 Joensuu, FINLAND

Ken Lertzman, School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, CANADA V5A 1S6

Richard Miller, HC71 4.51 Hwy 205, Burns, OR 97720 USA

Renzo Motta, Dep. AGROSELVITER, University of Turin, Via Leonardo Da Vinci 44, I - 10095 Grugliasco, ITALY

Michael Murray, 314 Cherry Street, Moscow, ID 83843 USA

Robert Olson, USDA Forest Service, Lassen National Forest, 55 S. Sacramento St., Susanville, CA 96130 USA

Wolfgang Ortloff, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow, and Landscape Research, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, SWITZERLAND

William Romme, Department of Biology, Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO 81301-3999 USA

Carl Skinner, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 2400 Washington Ave., Redding, CA 96001 USA

Sydney Smith, Modoc National Forest, USDA Forest Service, 1800 W. 12th Str., Alturas, CA 96101 USA

Paul Sneed, Department of Environmental Studies, Prescott College, Prescott, AZ 86301 USA

Thomas W. Swetnam, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA

Elaine Kennedy Sutherland, U.S. Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Str., 359 Main Rd, Delaware, OH 43015 USA

Alan Taylor, Department of Geography, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA

Thomas T. Veblen, Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA
For more information, contact Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, 520-621-7681, (grissino@LTRR.Arizona.EDU)